Blog

October 26, 2018

Can Using the “Happinometer” Foster Well-being and Resilience? A National Academy of Medicine Exploration

First, a familial confession. I recall at sitting at my parents home in the waning hippy era of mid-1970s when a close friend of my elder siblings who had strong back-to-the-land inclinations faced a grilling about her life plans at our pressurized family table. Education? Employment? Contributions to community? The friend must have known she was thumbing her nose at her interrogators when she shared her counter-cultural goal: “I just want to be happy.”
October 6, 2018

AMTA’s Strategic Investments in Accreditation, Education and Research Advance the Massage Profession

The American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) recently announced strategic investments in other key massage organizations that affirm the strongest organizational alignment that field has seen for two decades. With AMTA’s growing membership – up 50% in 5 years – the not-for-profit that has for years fueled the field’s research arm has now stoked activity in its accreditation and educator organizations.
October 2, 2018

Paradigm Shift? Harvard Medical School Considering Mission Reframe from Sickness Model to Health

On September 26, 2018, Harvard Medical School announced to its faculty that it is “reassessing” the School’s mission statement. An invitation to comment and provide feedback on a draft of a new mission was sent by microbiology and immunology professor Peter Howley, MD. Howley leads a committee for Medical School Dean George Daley, MD, PhD that is wrestling with a transformational theme that most unifies the diverse parties in the movement for integrative health and medicine. Harvard is bellying up toward reckoning with the need to shift the medical industry toward a system for creating health.
September 27, 2018

Clinician Insights: State of Integrative Oncology Via the Global Lens of a Special Issue

Not long ago researchers at Yale cast a pall over the use of complementary medicine in the care of cancer patients – a.k.a. “integrative oncology.” The negativity was based on a fundamental misclassification. Nevertheless, the wrong-headed results prompted a flurry of news accounts that suggested the users of complementary medicine “die earlier than those who didn’t.” A more expansive and deeper look at the potential values of integrative oncology can be gained via a recent Special Focus Issue on Integrative Oncology with its 6 invited reviews, 13 original research articles, 7 commentaries, and 2 editorials. The submissions came from 4 continents.